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The Best and Worst Thing to Ever Happen to Recovery Comedian, Veronica Porras
Recovery Comedians, Comics Anonymous, Recovery Comedy, Recovery Comic, Clean and Sober Comedy
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Veronica Porras's comedy career started in October 2006, a year after getting into recovery for being affected by the addictions and problem drinking of friends and family. She knew she had a problem because when other people drank and used, SHE was the one that got crazy, obsessive, controlling. At the same time, she expected these people in her life to take care of ALL her emotional, spiritual, needs.
The Relationship was the Higher Power and it lead her into some not so nice places. However, her continuous practice of going to meetings, sponsoring others, and 12 step service has helped to stay out of other people's drinking/using.
Veronica’s comedy is an exaggerated extension of her recovery persona. She has lead various workshops to help others in recovery on finding the funny through the inventory process. She hopes that her comedy can teach the non-drinker/user friends or family that there is comedy from being affected and though the disease of addiction and alcoholism is devastating, cunning, baffling and powerful, there is freedom and hope.

Recovery Comedy:  What made you decide to become a stand-up comedian and how long have you been performing?

Veronica Porras:  My early comedian heroes were Gallagher and my schizophrenic aunt. Though I didn't know that my aunt suffered mental illness I always knew her as someone who loved to sing and laugh. I just thought she was having a good time. The seeds of becoming a stand-up myself took place a couple of years after I graduated from college. I started going to a lot of open mics. MySpace was big back then and through the platform I started connecting with local comics and going to their shows. I began helping promote the Bay Area shows of one of the comedians I met on MySpace, Justin McClure. We meet up for lunch one day and I started to pick his brain on how he got started and he told me about San Francisco Comedy College run by Kurtis Mathews. So, I started taking classes and doing the open mics. I studied there for 3 years from 2006-2009. Honestly, if it weren't for the SF Comedy College, I wouldn't be doing stand-up.

Recovery Comedy:  Were you performing stand-up comedy before you got into recovery?

Veronica Porras:  No, The Stand-up came after I got into Recovery. I got into Recovery in 2005, started stand up in 2006. The recovery step work gave me the courage to take other steps to live my own life and do what I love to do.

Recovery Comedy:  Where does your inspiration for material come from?

Veronica Porras:  Recovery comedy is my passion, so it's based on my recovery experiences. There's a difference when I do impressions of personas vs. doing an impression of actual person from my recovery fellowship. I base jokes from my own personal experience. Other people are part of my experience, but I just do it as personas or characters. On the friends and family side of recovery in general, it's mostly "talk" about humor, but when it comes to the action of "humor" things can get dicey.  The natural tendency to control, manage, fix, give unsolicited advice rears its ugly head.  I have experienced unsolicited advice from my 12 step fellows on how I should do my comedy when they have never set foot on stage. To me, I think that's funny and I'll do a joke, bit, or impression based on that experience. I will never please everyone with my type of comedy, but my goal is to get the majority of the audience laughing.

Recovery Comedy:  What is your joke writing process?

Veronica Porras:  I write on stage. I'll jot down a couple of ideas and work them out on stage. I'll call up my best friend Dee and tell her a story of what happened to me. The funny also reveals itself in inventory and step work. I'll go over my old journals and set what's in there. One time I went over some inventory from like 5 years about finances and I wrote "I save money every week" and 5 years later I was going through a personal financial crisis and re-read that financial inventory from 5 years ago and I was like "Who wrote this!? I don't save at ALL!"

Recovery Comedy:  Is your family supportive of your comedy career?

Veronica Porras:  How funny. A part of my recovery is refraining from getting outside approval. LOL. They sometimes are and sometimes not. When I start pushing the envelope or cross the line my mom worries, but I don't know if that's a mom thing or if she's being co-dependent. That my comedy style is somewhat a reflection of how she raised me. In any case, being raised in alcoholic home groomed me to be a comedian. So, I'm OK if they support me and I'm OK if they don't. My dad sends me texts messages that I MUST get a stage name like Lady Gaga or something. That whole Adult Child of an Alcoholic is a gnarly beast when it comes to getting support from family or maybe I'm reading into this question too much?? #shrug.

Recovery Comedy: Is comedy part of your healing process?

Veronica Porras:  Absolutely, I started my recovery comedy path by doing jokes about my recovery experience at 12 step events and conventions. I knew I was on the right path when the Area Delegate at the time called me to inform me that my jokes were pissing people off! A joke I told 4 years ago by the way. There were plenty of other fellows that were appreciative about my joke on how serious our friends and family take themselves and the notion that you can't make fun of the recovery program. Though, yes, I agree my 12-step program saved and continues to save my life, for me, poking fun at the ridiculousness of the disease and recovery helps keep Fundamentalism at bay. Recovery comedy from the perspective of being affected by addiction and alcoholism has given me insights on truths that most don't want to look at especially from the friends and family perspective.  We’re the "good guys".  We paid the bills.  We took the kids to school.  We did all the covering up and made all sorts of excuses for our alcoholic/addict loves ones. I didn't know that I too had a part in the family disease of addiction/alcoholism as well. Thought it was ALL my dad and mom's fault.

Recovery Comedy:  What was your worst experience performing comedy?

Veronica Porras:  I got removed as a youth mentor in my 12-step program for a joke I did on self-harm at a convention. My personal recovery was deeply affected in ways that I could not even imagine. Being removed was horrible enough, then my sponsor at the time, who was present at the show, discontinued being my sponsor and I had to get a new sponsor. About a month after being removed, another mentor called me up and just started screaming at me for doing such a joke. One recovery friend ended up betraying my trust when I confided to her about being removed and this person sent an email to our district, WSO, and my mother that I was banned from going to the 12-step meeting that this person started. To be friends one day and not friends because of my comedy was hard to accept. Throughout all this, it was an opportunity to practice my program of "principals over personalities". I say this as a fact that this did happen.  To those who are reading this, understand that the disease of alcoholism doesn't stop just because it's in a recovery structure. We're all sick people getting better or at least trying. Everyone in recovery has their own path and context is everything in stand-up comedy. The audience and environment at that particular convention was not set up for my type of comedy. I was dealing with individuals who probably were not ready to laugh at such subject matter. Self-harm was too real to find the funny and I completely misread the audience.

Recovery Comedy:  What was your best experience performing comedy?

Veronica Porras:  I got removed as a youth mentor in my 12-step program for a joke I did on self-harm at a convention. It was the worst/best experience in my comedy/recovery path. I'm currently banned from performing at the Saturday Talent Show. (OK I just laughed out loud when I typed that sentence! LOL) At this same conference where I was banned, I was booked to do the 7am Sunday Morning Variety show. The booker liked my comedy and wanted me to do his show. It all worked out, I got to perform. My Higher Power was taking care of me throughout this whole experience. I was free to be me and did a similar set to the one that got me removed in the first place, except this time it came from my heart. The previous comedy set that got me removed came from a place of anger. The experience of being removed/reinstated gave me the courage to stand up for myself and my right to process my recovery in a way that works for me. My recovery approach may not be the "traditional" 12 step approach, but like many things in recovery, "You take what you like and leave the rest". Within the context of the steps, traditions, concepts, and warranties, MY disease needs a non-traditional approach. In the aftermath of this removal/reinstatement, the mentors and teens came around and reached out to me to lead a workshop on finding the funny by applying the inventory process. That workshop was a game changer in my personal recovery. I discovered that it's probably a good idea to do a workshop on finding the funny and afterward do a comedy show. It was the first time some of the teens in recovery did an inventory. Two new comer teens came to that event and they had such a good time they want to come back. I know in my heart that this approach works. This approach may not be for everyone, but for those who would like to try this approach of finding the funny in their inventory/pain I'm available.

Recovery Comedy:  What is your comedy dream?

Veronica Porras: Connect and perform with other stand-up comics recovering from being affected from the family disease of addiction and alcoholism. I can't be the only one.

To find out more information about Veronica Porras or to book her for your next Recovery Event just click here!
If you like what we are doing here at Recovery Comedy please tell your friends and help us spread the word. Without you and your support none of this is possible. Also, don’t forget to follow or like us on these lovely social media sites: Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube


Comedy is Fermented Pain According to Recovery Comedian, John Moses
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John Moses has been delightfully offending audiences throughout the United States, Canada and the U.K. for more than 10 years. This year John was a finalist at the Laughing Skull Comedy Festival in Atlanta and is a favorite at festivals all over including; The Boston Comedy Festival; The Asheville Comedy Festival; The Cottage Country Comedy Festival; and the Dark Comedy Festival in Toronto where he roasted Porn Legend Ron Jeremy.
John released his debut album On The Edge in 2012. It was voted one of Laughspin.com’s “10 Best Comedy Albums of 2012,” and given their dubious distinction as “The One Album From 2012 You Should Get By A Comedian You Probably Never Heard Of.” It is still in regular rotation on Sirius XM RawDog, The Foxxhole, and Canada Laughs.

In 2013, he became an immediate favorite on AXS.TV’s Gotham Comedy Live and was featured in their special “Best of Season One.” In 2015 he made his second appearance on Gotham Comedy Live and received high praise from the show’s host, the iconic Dom Irrera. In 2016 he made his third appearance on the show.

He released his second album Upper Middle Trash in May of 2016. Raw Dog on SiriusXM named that album one of the best albums of 2016.

An equal-opportunity offender, John’s comedy transcends racial and cultural barriers—appealing to black, white, and brown audiences, the young and old, upstanding citizens and the morally bankrupt. John’s style is shrewd, raw and uncompromisingly funny.

Recovery Comedy: What were you like as a kid?

John Moses: Insecure, low self-esteem, desperate for people's approval. You know future alcoholic.

Recovery Comedy: What made you decide to become a stand-up comedian and how long have you been performing?

John Moses: I was always goofing off wherever I could, in front of whoever would listen. But it was actually my dad that pushed me to do it. I've been doing it now for 18 years.

Recovery Comedy: Were you performing stand-up comedy before you got into recovery?

John Moses: Yeah, and some people suggested that I quit doing comedy when I first got sober. I told them that I got into to recovery to become a better horse thief. One suggestion that was given to me that I'll pass on to any artists or performers that are in early recovery, is to call someone before and after the gig. Don't hang out if it can be helped. Take the money and run.

Recovery Comedy: Does your comedy have a message and if so what is it?

John Moses: Absolutely, that we're all full of sh!t. I try to talk about ways that I'm full of it and see if anybody can relate. I like digging around for fallibility. I think it's what connects us. Also, I can't stand whining.

Recovery Comedy: Who are your comedy idols?

John Moses: Chris Rock, Doug Standhope, Nick DiPaolo, some dead guys.

Recovery Comedy: Where does your inspiration for material come from?

John Moses: I don't know, sometimes things just strike me as funny.  It's less inspiration and more a forced habit. You wanna do this? You gotta write. But when inspiration hits, it's awesome.

Recovery Comedy: What is your joke writing process?

John Moses: I talk a lot out loud to myself, usually in a room or driving somewhere. Everyone thinks I'm on a Bluetooth, it looks totally normal.

Recovery Comedy: What is your kryptonite?

John Moses: A cold draft beer.

Recovery Comedy: Is your family supportive of your comedy career?

John Moses: I mean they were when I was a kid, you know pumping my head full of dreams. I think they wonder where it's going now. They're really gonna freak in ten more years.

Recovery Comedy: Is comedy part of your healing process?

John Moses: Absolutely, I'm a big believer in the idea that comedy is pain fermented. At least that's the stuff I love. I had a tough childhood (not the toughest, but tougher than most) and there were lots of situations where you could either laugh or cry about it. I cried plenty, but you learn to laugh. The way addicts learn to laugh at some of the horrible garbage they went through.

Recovery Comedy: What was your worst experience performing comedy?

John Moses: Well that's the thing, even the awful ones are all kinda funny now.

Recovery Comedy: What was your best experience performing comedy?

John Moses: I've met some of my idols, played some incredible shows, but it still hasn't happened yet.

Recovery Comedy: What is your favorite joke?

John Moses: What does a 90-year old woman's ***** taste like? Depends.

Recovery Comedy: What is your comedy dream?

John Moses: Paying for my daughter’s college education with funny money. If she even thinks about doing comedy, I'll never speak to her again. LAWYER!

To find out more information about John Moses or to book him for your next Recovery Event just click here!
If you like what we are doing here at Recovery Comedy, please tell your friends and help us spread the word. Without you and your support, none of this is possible. Also, don’t forget to follow or like us on these lovely social media sites: Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube


Comedy is Part of His Healing Process, but it isn't Therapy: Recovery Standup Patrick Holbert
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Patrick has been making his living in NYC since 2003. A scene regular, you can find him in the city’s hottest comedy rooms every night. He has performed on Sirius XM and hosts the internationally syndicated TV show “The Movie Loft.” He has appeared on TruTV’s “Hack My Life” and "Mysteries at the Museum" on the Travel Channel. Patrick is often asked to emcee comedy shows because of his playful wit and affability. The NY Times recently called him the "charming M.C." of the children's variety show he performs in weekly. You can also catch him online co-hosting “The Comic’s Table” podcast. Last summer he celebrated eight years of sobriety.

Recovery Comedy:  What were you like as a kid?

Patrick Holbert:  I was a shy kid until about fourth grade. I didn't talk much until that year when I got put in the same classroom as my best friend. We sat in the back of the room and screwed around all day and that's where I learned I was funny.

Recovery Comedy:  What made you decide to become a stand-up comedian and how long have you been performing?

Patrick Holbert:  I've wanted to be a comic ever since I was a kid when I first saw standup clips on Comedy Central in the early 90's. I remember the channel was pretty basic and they'd just show a bit or two from random comics on a loop. I loved how funny someone could be with just a microphone.

Recovery Comedy:  Were you performing stand-up comedy before you got into recovery?

Patrick Holbert:  I did a handful of open mics when I was in college. Unfortunately, I discovered drinking at the same time and the drinking won. I started performing almost daily about three and a half years ago, after I'd already been sober.

Recovery Comedy:  Does your comedy have a message and if so what is it?

Patrick Holbert:  We've all been through challenges and we've all got problems but we can have a lot of fun talking about them if we want to.

Recovery Comedy:  Who are your comedy idols?

Patrick Holbert:  Jerry Seinfeld, Andy Kaufman, Norm MacDonald. I don't even think what I'm trying to do is all that similar to them, but those are guys that I always thought were funny as long as I can remember.

Recovery Comedy:  Where does your inspiration for material come from?

Patrick Holbert:  Directly from my fourth step! I'd say I'm kidding, but most of my bits start from resentments, regrets, and fears that I have.

Recovery Comedy:  What is your joke writing process? Patrick Holbert:  I do a lot of free writing in the morning. It's a habit I got into when I worked through The Artist's Way program about five years ago. A lot of times certain themes or ideas will keep popping up, so I know I need to play with those ideas by making lists and making connections in funny ways.

Other times I'll be riffing on stage and a funny punch line will appear, so then I'll go back and flesh out that idea and try to re-create it in a more written, bit-like way. If that one punch line worked, I try to think of how I can add a laugh before or after it.

Meeting with other comics for writing sessions helps a lot too. Sometimes other comics think of directions to go in that I would not have ever considered.

Recovery Comedy:  What is your kryptonite?

Patrick Holbert:  Junk food-- I may be sober from booze 8 years, but I still try to get tipsy on Zebra Cakes.

Recovery Comedy:  Is your family supportive of your comedy career?

Patrick Holbert:  Yes- any time I perform in my home town area, they all come out to support. Sometimes I get stuck in this narrative that my family "doesn't know me" but the truth is they know me quite well and probably believe in me more than I do. I feel lucky to be able to trust in that.

Recovery Comedy:  Is comedy part of your healing process?

Patrick Holbert: Absolutely. I'll never be a "comedy is my therapy" kind of person (because I think actual therapy is necessary) but writing and performing bits about a painful past or mental health and alcoholism does give me a way to process everything. I think if we can have fun with the dark parts of our lives, we can take power away from them.

Recovery Comedy:  What was your worst experience performing comedy?

Patrick Holbert:  Oh my god there have been so many. I must be lucky to not have one exact moment that sticks out. All I can think of are all the epically long and bad open mics that I've sat through until the end only to find out the host never had my name in the bucket or on the list. The most brutal experiences tend to come from incompetence on the production side, not anything on the audience side (although I've certainly faced off against some terrible people in audiences). I'll keep you guys updated as soon as something traumatic happens on stage. This answer would be much more interesting if I'd been performing comedy as a drunk.

Recovery Comedy:  What was your best experience performing comedy?

Patrick Holbert:  This past winter I booked a week of shows throughout PA, NJ, and DC. I performed a 5-minute guest spot on the DC show which was just a bar basement and one of my oldest friends came out. We hung out for the following show where Louis CK, Joe List, and Mark Normand surprised this small venue with an appearance. It felt special to even be just a little part of it.

Recovery Comedy:  What is your comedy dream?

Patrick Holbert:  I want my material about mental health and recovery to be so good that it will be hilarious to any audience, any time, anywhere, and in any form. In my stand-up, in films, in books, etc.

To find out more information about Patrick Holbert or to book him for your next Recovery Event just click here!

If you like what we are doing here at Recovery Comedy please tell your friends and help us spread the word. Without you and your support none of this is possible. Also, don’t forget to follow or like us on these lovely social media sites: Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and YouTube

The Urge to Leave Society is Strong with this One: Recovery Comedian Matthew Zerilli
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Matthew Zerilli is a stand-up comedian based in Traverse City, MI.
Having been raised between Michigan’s rural Upper Peninsula and the suburbs of Detroit, he has developed an outsider style of comedy that is part social commentary and part absurd report on the human condition. Matthew is a recovering alcoholic, relapsed Catholic, and aspiring narcissist. He has been called the Barry White of Comedy due to the raw, baby-making power of his jokes.

Recovery Comedy:  What were you like as a kid?

Matthew Zerilli: I was a goofy, oddball kid that was in my own head a lot. I was always a little misfit. One of my favorite stories my parents tell was how they dropped me off at the first day of pre-school and apparently I just left. They had to come pick me up a couple miles away later that day. The urge to leave society hasn’t really changed much, but making people laugh has always made life more tolerable.

Recovery Comedy:  What made you decide to become a stand-up comedian and how long have you been performing?

Matthew Zerilli:  I have been obsessed with stand up my whole life. When other kids were practicing sports, I was watching old Stand Up specials and listening to my parents George Carlin, Richard Pryor and Steve Martin albums. I have always had the urge to try it, but couldn’t realize that it was possible until I had been sober for some time.  I had to “give myself permission” to take the risk (if that makes any sense). I have been writing comedy for years, and just started performing a little over a year ago. Since I got that first laugh on stage, I have been hooked and haven’t looked back.

Recovery Comedy:  Were you performing stand-up comedy before you got into recovery?

Matthew Zerilli:  No. Even though I started a little later in life, I am often grateful for the fact that I waited. There is something to be said for being able to approach things with a clear head.

Recovery Comedy:  Does your comedy have a message and if so what is it?

Matthew Zerilli:  The cardinal rule is “try to be funny,” but the more I write and develop, the more I see patterns of questioning absurd social structures, trying to find ways that we are all similar, and basically just talking about what it is like to be a human. At its best, I think comedy is a powerful tool for equality and I do my best to honor that.

Recovery Comedy:  Who are your comedy idols?

Matthew Zerilli:  Wow, so many! The “Top 5” for me are Dave Chappelle, George Carlin, Richard Pryor, Brian Regan, and Mitch Hedberg. Comedy is cool, though, in that I can hear a brilliant joke at an open mic and it can totally light up my brain just like any of the greats. It is really hard to pick just a few, but those are some good ones.

Recovery Comedy:  Where does your inspiration for material come from?

Matthew Zerilli:  Well, I think most comedians are pretty empathic. My material comes from my struggles, or observing others struggles, and trying to make those things funny and relatable.

Recovery Comedy:  What is your joke writing process?

Matthew Zerilli:  I am always thinking of premises to develop and writing them down all over the place (which can drive my wife crazy), and then setting aside time to develop things by writing them out long form. Lately, I am doing more “writing on stage” by working things out onstage and recording them to develop later.

Recovery Comedy:  What is your kryptonite?

Matthew Zerilli:  Excellent question. I have a couple of rescue dogs (Sully and Monkey) that are a huge part of my life. I have a real soft spot for animals and try to always find time to get them out for a walk or a hike. They keep me grounded and are a great audience to practice my jokes on!

Recovery Comedy:  Is your family supportive of your comedy career?

Matthew Zerilli:  For the most part (laughs). I think it was a difficult adjustment at first because it is a non-traditional path and they want me to be secure. Now that they have seen how serious I am about it and the joy it brings, they are pretty supportive. However, there is still the occasional joke or two that don’t exactly get the most enthusiastic support.

Recovery Comedy:  Is comedy part of your healing process?

Matthew Zerilli:  Absolutely. I remember the first time I talked about being sober and how anxious I was to get into that on stage. Getting laughs around something so sensitive really helped me feel more like a normal, healthy person. It Is a really valuable piece of my healing that I can’t imagine not doing. Comedy is total freedom for me.

Recovery Comedy:  What was your worst experience performing comedy?

Matthew Zerilli:  Well, I have certainly bombed plenty and had a few hecklers here and there. I would say the one that really stands out is the first time I tried a “Stand up Improv” show early in my career. This is where you get handed a topic on your way onstage and have to make it funny on the spot. It went horribly. I mean, it was profoundly awful. It was an important experience that made me look at my limitations and forced me to work on improvisation skills. I have since tried it again and survived!

Recovery Comedy:  What was your best experience performing comedy?

Matthew Zerilli:  My first feature show was my most memorable so far. Lots of family and friends were there and the room was packed. It was the longest time I had ever done onstage at that point (30 mins), and I had worked really hard to prepare and deliver a strong set. It was just one of those special nights where everything came together, I will remember it for a long time.

Recovery Comedy:  What is your favorite joke?

Matthew Zerilli:  There are so many, but I always come back to this Mitch Hedberg joke:

“I wanna hang a map of the world in my house. Then I'm gonna put pins into all the locations that I've traveled to. But first, I'm gonna have to travel to the top two corners of the map so it won't fall down.”

Recovery Comedy:  What is your comedy dream?

Matthew Zerilli:  I am so grateful to be part of the Comedy tradition in any way. To have the opportunity to make a living doing it in different places is really special. My ultimate dream is just to make as many people laugh as I can, as often as I can, for as long as I can.

To find out more information about Matthew Zerilli or to book him for your next Recovery Event just click here!
If you like what we are doing here at Recovery Comedy, please tell your friends and help us spread the word. Without you and your support none of this is possible. Also, don’t forget to follow or like us on these lovely social media sites: Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube


From "Accidentally Funny" to Award Winning Comedian: Recovery Comedy interviews Melinda
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Melinda is a comedian, writer and actress who travels the world doing stand-up with a focus on healing through humor, overcoming addiction, and female empowerment. Her smart storytelling style inspired the LA Weekly to call her "the female David Sedaris" and the Examiner to call her "a female Louie." She voices multiple characters on the Emmy-winning series Adventure Time and is the other half of the viral hit Confessions of a Tooth Fairy with Kristen Wiig. Her stand-up has been featured on The Late Late Show, Bonnie Hunt Show, BBC's World Stands Up, Comics Unleashed, Who Wants To Date a Comedian, Stand Up In Stilettos and Comedy TV. Other TV/ film appearances include Cameron Crowe’s Roadies, Comedy Central's Pretend Time with Nick Swardson, Reno 911, The Sarah Silverman Program, Important Things with Demetri Martin, Bill Maher's Bright Day, The Winner, Frank TV, Glory Daze, and Chris Kattan's Bollywood Hero.
She created, wrote, produced and starred in the digital series Romantic Encounters with Melinda, which won "outstanding achievement in writing and acting" at LA Web Fest, was an LA Weekly Web Award nominee for "best comedy series" and was an IndieWire Critic's Pick. It was also selected as a finalist in the 2014 “Make Em Laff” competition sponsored by Funny or Die and Los Angeles Film Festival. In 2013 she created the web series All Growz Up and in 2014 she cocreated The Program with Maria Bamford produced by Funny or Die Productions.
Her live show "What’s Up, Tiger Lily" was named "best stand up show" in LA Weekly & LAist and her critically acclaimed CD The Accidental Bisexual is available on iTunes. She’s a regular comedian at The Improv, Comedy Store, and storytelling shows like Sit N Spin at Comedy Central Stage. She is a regular contributor for Huffington Post Comedy, XOJane and Hellogiggles and her essays have been featured in LA Innuendo & Opium Magazine.

Recovery Comedy:  What were you like as a kid?

Melinda:  We moved 27 times so I was always the new girl. I did a lot of plays and made up characters and voices around the house.

Recovery Comedy:  What made you decide to become a stand-up comedian and how long have you been performing?

Melinda:  15 years…An acting teacher suggested I go into comedy because I was “accidentally funny.” I loved the autonomy of writing and creating your own material.

Recovery Comedy:  Were you performing stand-up comedy before you got into recovery?

Melinda:  Yes, those first few years of comedy were brought to you by vodka and cigarettes.

Recovery Comedy:  Does your comedy have a message and if so what is it?

Melinda:  Yes, my message is focused healing through humor—empowering and inspiring the human race.

Recovery Comedy:  Who are your comedy idols?

Melinda:  Maria Bamford, Louis CK, Kristen Wiig, Steve Martin and all comedians who repurpose their material into books, movies, series and specials. I love silly, absurd, poignant and smart comedy.

Recovery Comedy:  Where does your inspiration for material come from?

Melinda:  Life. It’s all around us at all times.

Recovery Comedy:  What is your joke writing process?

Melinda:  I am really just a channel for what happens in life. I think of it more as transcribing than writing.

Recovery Comedy:  What is your kryptonite?

Melinda:  Deep dish pizza and red wine—just being alone on a couch with that stuff like “you can’t hurt me cuz I’m gonna hurt me!”, getting sick, bringing it out to the trash bins for someone less
fortunate to enjoy, perhaps a homeless person…then bringing it back in 2 hours later to finish myself and realizing I’m the person less fortunate. : (

Recovery Comedy:  Is your family supportive of your comedy career?

Melinda:  Yes, although whenever I tell my mom about a success she says “that’s great honey, I hope that ends up working out for you one day.” I’m like it just did end up working out for me, this day, the day that I got the job."

Recovery Comedy:  Is comedy part of your healing process?

Melinda:  Absolutely. If I can find the light in a dark situation it not only heals me but it heals countless others going through a similar thing by enabling them to find the humor in it.

Recovery Comedy:  What was your worst experience performing comedy?

Melinda:  Bombing on America’s Got Talent.

Recovery Comedy:  What was your best experience performing comedy?

Melinda:  Performing for troops in 12 countries, cancer patients and just people who really needed it.

Recovery Comedy:  What is your favorite joke?

Melinda:  The ones that heal.

Recovery Comedy:  What is your comedy dream?

Melinda:  To write and star in my own series, movies and specials.



To find out more information about Melinda or to book her for your next Recovery Event just click here!
Drink coffee like a boss at your next meeting with the Recovery Comedy Coffee Mug, “One Sip at a Time!”
If you like what we are doing here at Recovery Comedy, please tell your friends and help us spread the word. Without you and your support none of this is possible. Also, don’t forget to follow or like us on these lovely social media sites: Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and YouTube